Year: 2013

NPR: “For Native Americans, Mental Health Budget Cuts Hit Hard” by Laurel G. Morales

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/09/12/221408312/for-native-americans-mental-health-budget-cuts-hit-hard?utm_medium=Email&utm_source=share&utm_campaign Native American tribes gave up millions of acres to the federal government in the 19th century in exchange for promises of funded health care, education and housing. But time and again, those funds have been cut. The recent across-the-board federal budget cuts, known as sequestration, are no exception. They came with a 5 percent reduction in funding for mental health services, including suicide prevention. That’s especially troubling for Native Americans, whose suicide rate are four times the national average. Because of the reduction, the Oglala Sioux Tribe in Pine Ridge, S.D., will not be able to hire two additional mental health service providers, says Cathy Abramson, chairwoman of the National Indian Health Board. And that could have devastating effects. “Since the beginning of the year, there have been 100 suicide attempts in 110 days on Pine Ridge,” Abramson said at a Senate committee hearing in Washington last spring. “We can’t take any more cuts. We just can’t.” Steps Toward Prevention Emmy Burruel still calls a sheep camp on the Navajo Nation home, even though she lives outside the reservation in Flagstaff, Ariz. Three years ago, she and her husband were fixing up their guest room when they received a phone call from her mother, crying hysterically. “She’s like, ‘We found your brother,’ and I’m like, ‘What do you mean, you found my brother?’ And she says, ‘He’s gone....

Read More

Alexcia Taylor-Boggs, NCIA Commissioner and President and CEO of Oshni Ponca, LLC selected to NCAIED’s 2013 “Native American 40 under 40.”

The National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development (NCAIED) is pleased to announce its 2013 “Native American 40 Under 40″ award recipients have been selected. This prestigious award recognizes 40 emerging American Indian leaders from across Indian Country who have demonstrated leadership, initiative, and dedication and made significant contributions in business and/or in their community. The 2013 Native American 40 Under 40 Awards will be presented at NCAIED’s 38th Annual Indian Progress In Business Awards Gala (INPRO) being held at RES Arizona October 24th at the Wild Horse Pass Hotel &...

Read More

The Maximilian-Bodmer Expedition Exhibition at the Joslyn

http://www.joslyn.org/collections-and-exhibitions/temporary-exhibitions/details.aspx?ID=180 The Maximilian-Bodmer Expedition   4/25/2013 – 6/15/2014   In 1832, German explorer and naturalist Prince Maximilian of Wied and Swiss artist Karl Bodmer embarked on a two-year journey that would take them up the Missouri River and into the heart of the West. Joslyn’s celebrated Maximilian-Bodmer collection includes watercolors, drawings, manuscripts, and memorabilia from their voyage, as well as the printing plates used to create 81 spectacular engravings that illustrated Maximilian’s 1843 publication, Travels in the Interior of North America, 1832, 1833, 1834. In 1989, a limited edition of engravings was printed using these original plates and carefully hand-colored by master craftsmen. An exhibition of 40 of these prints illustrating Maximilian and Bodmer’s travels will be on view in communities throughout the state in 2013 and 2014. Visitors will see Karl Bodmer’s vivid reflection of the landscapes, wildlife, frontier settlements, and American Indian peoples that he and Maximilian encountered during their expedition along the Upper Missouri River. A mobile tour — accessible at (402) 881-3138 — highlighting 20 artworks in the exhibition will be available at each venue. Additionally, an online teacher guide and outreach trunk with educational resources for use in local classrooms will offer a deeper understanding of the nineteenth-century West.                                                          Check back for announcements of additional exhibition venues and to find Karl Bodmer in a town close to home! Venues: Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer...

Read More

Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska wins NASA contract

WINNEBAGO, Neb. | A Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska company has won a $23 million federal contract to provide support services to NASA, a release from the tribe issued Tuesday said. All Native Inc. will perform the work at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., and at all NASA Goddard Space Flight Center facilities across the U.S., the release said. The Office of Human Capital Management Professional Services contract starts Sept. 1. Support services will include recruitment projects, ongoing staffing and classification services, training, coaching, leadership development, organizational effectiveness, career development, labor relations and more. All Native Inc. is a company within Ho-Chunk Inc.’s All Native Group division.  Ho-Chunk Inc. is the tribe’s economic development arm. The All Native Group consists of companies involved in communications, information technology, managed services, operations and maintenance and training. All Native Inc. competed for the contract with other companies in the U.S. Small Business Association 8(a) Business Development Program, the release said. The program helps small disadvantaged businesses participate in the open market by offering mentoring, business counseling, training and financial assistance. “Ho-Chunk Inc. is thrilled to start this valuable relationship with NASA,” said Lance Morgan, Ho-Chunk president and CEO. “Ho-Chunk Inc. and its companies work hard to provide customers with the best service and fair pricing. We appreciate NASA’s decision to work with All Native Inc. on this contract, and we look forward to...

Read More

Archives