Author: staff

Katie Brossy: A 2017 Real. Strong. Woman. of Distinction

Congratulations to Katie Brossy who was recently selected as a Woman of Distinction by the Lyre magazine- the national publication for the Alpha Chi Omega Sorority.  Brossy continues to serve as a positive role model and inspiration for Native youth.   She is a member of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska and is a past president of the Native American Bar Association of Washington, D.C. Her practice focuses on the representation of Indian tribes, tribal governmental instrumentalities, and tribally owned enterprises. She has worked on a number of highly significant tribal issues, including one of the largest Indian water rights...

Read More

Katie Brossy Selected Among Law360’s 2017 Rising Stars

Law360 has named American Indian practice senior counsel Katie Brossy as one of its 2017 Rising Stars. The list recognizes top lawyers under 40 years of age based on their outstanding accomplishments in their respective practice areas. Based in Washington, D.C., Ms. Brossy was recognized in the category of “Native American Law” for her involvement in a number of significant cases, including two of the largest-ever American Indian rights settlements—the $460 million water rights settlement on behalf of the Crow Tribe and the Osage Tribe of Oklahoma’s $380 million tribal trust claim settlement. A member of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska, Ms....

Read More

Omaha Mayor create board to help address Native American concerns after man’s death

Stothert to create board to help address Native American concerns after man's death OMAHA, Neb. (KMTV) – Omaha Mayor Jean Stothert announced the creation of a board to deal with issues that arose from the tasering and death of a man who was killed in Omaha on June 5th. Stothert and Omaha Police Chief Todd Schmaderer met with an upset group of Native American leaders on June 28th to address the tensions stemming from the in-custody death of an unarmed Native American, 29-year-old Zachary Bearheels, who died after Omaha police officers tased him, punched him and dragged him by his hair. Stothert said the group of Native Americans originally asked for the meeting to get answers and understanding on the lack of sensitivity shown to Bearheels. The meeting included a few members of the Native American community, as well as Schmaderer, and City Councilman, Ben...

Read More

Special artist’s reception on Sunday, July 9th at 6 p.m. at Fontenelle Forest meet Matika Wilbur and learn more about her fascinating work.

Fontenelle Forest is proud to present Matika Wilbur’s newest Project 562 collection: Natural Wanderment: Stewardship – Sovereignty – Sacredness, an exhibition of Native American portraits and stories that honors and seeks to protect ancestral ways of life and lands in North America. Project 562 offers a creative relationship with people from 562 Tribal Nations in the United States that builds cultural bridges, abandons stereotypes, and renews and inspires our national legacy. Matika Wilbur’s Project 562 is an inspiring artistic adventure unfolding the living history of North America’s ancient peoples. Over the last three years and 250,000 miles, Wilbur, one of...

Read More

Google honors the life and legacy of Dr. Susan La Flesche Picotte (1865-1915)

Today’s Doodle honors the life and legacy of Dr. Susan La Flesche Picotte (1865-1915), the first American Indian to earn a medical degree. Picotte grew up in Nebraska on the Omaha reservation, where her father urged her to “be somebody in the world.” She left her village and made her way east, eventually attending the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (featured in today’s Doodle on the left), where she graduated at the top of her class. Despite receiving numerous prestigious job offers, Picotte chose to return to the reservation to provide the medical care that her tribe badly needed...

Read More

Archives